Plum Bayou Log House - Mid-19th Century

Plum Bayou Log House - Mid-19th Century

The written history of this home begins in 1856. In that year it was found abandoned and in need of repair to house the Pemberton family who had just moved from North Carolina. It is built of logs from ancient cypress and has brick chimneys (few stones are found in the Delta where it was built). Originally located on Plum Bayou near the farming community of Scott, the house was moved 20 miles to Historic Arkansas in the 1970s.

1850s Farmstead

As you visit the Plum Bayou Log House, you will be surrounded by the 1850s Farmstead, which provides an authentic 19th century context for the Pemberton family's main house. It's easy to imagine how the family sustained themselves on this working farm, complete with a barn, slave cabin, privy, smoke house, blacksmith shop and raised bed gardens. The Farmstead was home not only to the Pembertons, but also to their slave John Perry, his wife and two children. When the Perrys were emancipated, they elected to stay there and became successful farmers. The Farmstead, which occupies a half block just north of the main museum building, is surrounded by an authentic snake rail fence.


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